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Want to learn more about the Clinical Trial Process? Read our blog for some interesting participant insights!  Learn More

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Cardiovascular Health Research can be comprised of many individualized areas. Chase Medical Research conducts trials that are under the terminology of Cardiovascular Disease. These Cardiovascular trials include the following:

    • Hypertension (high blood pressure)
      High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, is a repeatedly elevated blood pressure exceeding 140 over 90 mmHg — a systolic pressure above 140 with a diastolic pressure above 90.
    • Hyperlipidemia (high cholesterol)
      Cholesterol is the most common type of steroid in the body and a critically important molecule. Cholesterol is carried in the bloodstream as lipoproteins. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is the “bad” cholesterol, conversely, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol is the “good” cholesterol.
    • Atrial Fibrillation
      Atrial fibrillation is an abnormality in the heart rhythm which involves irregular and often rapid beating of the heart.
    • Coronary Artery Disease
      Heart disease (coronary artery disease) is caused by a buildup of cholesterol deposits in the coronary arteries. Risk factors for heart disease include smoking, high blood pressure, heredity, diabetes, peripheral artery disease, and obesity. Symptoms include chest pain and shortness of breath. There are a variety of tests used to diagnose coronary artery disease. Treatment includes life-style changes, medications, procedures, or surgery.
  • Cardiovascular Disease in conjunction with Obesity
    Obesity can be a major contributing factor leading to coronary artery disease.

 

To learn more about the clinical trials that we are presently conducting or are about to begin, please contact us at (203) 419-4404 or click here:

SEE ENROLLING TRIALS

 

*some content referenced from MedTerms.com