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Want to learn more about the Clinical Trial Process? Read our blog for some interesting participant insights!  Learn More

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Chase Medical Research has been conducting Central Nervous System clinical trials since the late 1990′s. These trials have focused on the treatment of many disorders and diseases including research in the following areas:

    • Alzheimer’s Disease
      Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a slowly progressive disease of the brain that is characterized by impairment of memory and eventually by disturbances in reasoning, planning, language, and perception. Many scientists believe that Alzheimer’s disease results from an increase in the production or accumulation of a specific protein (beta-amyloid protein) in the brain that leads to nerve cell death.
    • Migraine Headaches
      A form of vascular headache. Migraine headache is caused by a combination of vasodilatation (enlargement of blood vessels) and the release of chemicals from nerve fibers that coil around the blood vessels. During a migraine attack, the temporal artery enlarges. (The temporal artery is an artery that lies on the outside of the skull just under the skin of the temple.) Enlargement of the temporal artery stretches the nerves that coil around the artery and causes the nerves to release chemicals. The chemicals cause inflammation, pain, and further enlargement of the artery. The increasing enlargement of the artery magnifies the pain.
    • Depression
      Depressive disorders have been with mankind since the beginning of recorded history. In the Bible, King David, as well as Job, suffered from this affliction. Hippocrates referred to depression as melancholia, which literally means black bile. Black bile, along with blood, phlegm, and yellow bile were the four humors (fluids) that described the basic medical physiology theory of that time. Depression, also referred to as clinical depression, has been portrayed in literature and the arts for hundreds of years, but what do we mean today when we refer to a depressive disorder? In the 19th century, depression was seen as an inherited weakness of temperament. In the first half of the 20th century, Freud linked the development of depression to guilt and conflict. John Cheever, the author and a modern sufferer of depressive disorder, wrote of conflict and experiences with his parents as influencing his development of depression.
    • Insomnia (difficulty with sleeping)
      Insomnia is the perception or complaint of inadequate or poor-quality sleep because of difficulty falling asleep; waking up frequently during the night with difficulty returning to sleep; waking up too early in the morning; or un-refreshing sleep. Secondary insomnia is the most common type of insomnia. Causes can be from illnesses, pain, anxiety, depression, medication, caffeine, tobacco, alcohol, or another sleep disorder. Treatment for insomnia include lifestyle changes, cognitive behavioral therapy, and medication.
  • Generalized Anxiety Disorder
    Anxiety is a feeling of apprehension and fear characterized by physical symptoms. Anxiety disorders are serious medical illnesses that affect approximately 19 million American adults.

 

To learn more about the clinical trials that we are presently conducting or are about to begin, please contact us at (203) 419-4404 or click here:

SEE ENROLLING TRIALS

 

*some content referenced from MedTerms.com